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2020 《英语二》 每日一练(10月24日)

阅读分析

 All Sumerian cities recognized a number of gods in common,including the sky god,the lord of storms,and the morning and evening star.__1__the Sumerian worshipped the goddess of fertility,love,and war,she was evidently lower__2__status than the male gods,indicating that in a more urbanized society the__3__that the peoples of previous times had paid to the earth mother goddess had__4__. The gods seemed hopelessly violent and __5__,and one‘s life a period of slavery at their easy will. The epic poem The Creation emphasizes that__6__were created to enable the gods to__7__ up working. Each city moreover had its own god,who was considered to__8__ the temple literally and who was in theory the owner of all property within the city.__9__the priests who interpreted the will of the god and controlled the__10__ of the economic produce of the city were favored__11__ their supernatural and material functions __12__. When,after 3,000 B. C.,growing warfare among the cities made military leadership__13__,the head of the army who became king assumed a(n)__14__position between the god,whose agent he was,and the priestly class,whom he had both to use and to __15__. Thus king and priests represented the upper class in a hierarchical society.__16__them were the scribes,the secular attendants of the temple,who__17__every aspect of the city’s economic life and who developed a rough judicial system.__18__the temple officials,society was divided among an elite or__19__ group of large landowners and military leaders;a mixed group of merchants,artisans,and craftsmen,free peasants who__20__ the majority of the population;and slaves.

1.【单选题】[A] on 
[B] in 
[C] with 
[D] about

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2.【单选题】[A] use 
[B] turn 
[C] give 
[D] back

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3.【单选题】[A] pacify 
[B] tempt 
[C] suppress 
[D] manipulate

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阅读分析

  Read the following text. Choose the best word(s) for each numbered blank and mark [A], [B], [C] or [D] on ANSWER SHEET 1.

  The Treasury could pocket 20 million a year in extra fines once the country‘s speed camera network is expanded. Motoring organizations warned that the __1__could become a poll tax on wheels’,__2__huge number of drivers. There could be many more incidents of vandalism __3__cameras.The warnings came__4__a Daily Mail survey found almost all the 23 police forces in England and Wales were either__5__to expansion plans or considering __6__.

  Nationwide,the number of speeding tickets is expected to treble,__7__ 90 million a year.__8__the scheme,police keep some of the cash from fines to __9__the costs of fitting and maintaining extra cameras and__10__that existing ones always have film in them. The rest will go to the Treasury. Both Ministers and police insist the scheme is aimed__11__at making roads safer. They point to trials in eight areas which cut collisions by a quarter and deaths and serious injuries by __12__a half.

  But motoring organizations fear cameras will be sited on relatively safe__13__fast stretches to catch as many drivers as possible. Some forces are also expected to__14__the“threshold”speeds at which cameras are__15__to the absolute legal minimum-15 mph in a 10 mph limit,and 26 mph in a 20 mph zone. This could encourage drivers to stare at their speedometers instead of concentrating on the road,and __16__to more accidents. Sue Nicholson,head of campaigns at the RAC,said,“We don‘t have a problem with speed cameras __17__. But we do have concerns about__18__they are sited. Police risk losing credibility __19__motorists if cameras are seen as revenue-raising __20__safety devices.”


4.【单选题】[A] promotions 
[B] punishments 
[C] penalties 
[D] payments

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5.【单选题】[A] From 
[B] Under 
[C] On 
[D] With

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阅读分析

  People have speculated for centuries about a future without work.Today is no different,with academics,writers,and activists once again 1 that technology is replacing human workers. Some imagine that the coming work-free world will be defined by 2 . A few wealthy people will own all the capital,and the masses will struggle in an impoverished wasteland..

  A different and not mutually exclusive 3 holds that the future will be a wasteland of a different sort,one 4 by purposelessness:Without jobs to give their lives 5 ,people will simply become lazy and depressed. 6 today’s unemployed don’t seem to be having a great time. One Gallup poll found that 20 percent of Americans who have been unemployed for at least a year report having depression,double the rate for 7 Americans. Also,some research suggests that the 8 for rising rates of mortality,mental-health problems,and addicting9 poorly-educated middle-aged people is shortage of well-paid jobs. Perhaps this is why many 10 the agonizing dullness of a jobless future.

  But it doesn’t 11 follow from findings like these that a world without work would be filled with unease. Such visions are based on the 12 of being unemployed in a society built on the concept of employment. In the 13 of work,a society designed with other ends in mind could 14 strikingly different circumstances for the future of labor and leisure. Today,the 15 of work may be a bit overblown. “Many jobs are boring,degrading,unhealthy,and a waste of human potential,” says John Danaher,a lecturer at the National University of Ireland in Galway.

  These days,because leisure time is relatively 16 for most workers,people use their free time to counterbalance the intellectual and emotional 17 of their jobs. “When I come home from a hard day’s work,I often feel 18 ,” Danaher says,adding,“In a world in which I don’t have to work,I might feel rather different”—perhaps different enough to throw himself 19 a hobby or a passion project with the intensity usually reserved for 20 matters.


6.【单选题】[A] under 
[B] beyond 
[C] alongside 
[D] among

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7.【单选题】[A] statistically 
[B] occasionally 
[C] necessarily 
[D] economically

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阅读分析

Directions:

   Read the following text. Choose the best word (s) for each numbered blank and mark A, B, C or D on the ANSWER SHEET. (10 points)

   People have speculated for centuries about a future without work. Today is no different, with academics, writers, and activists once again _1_ that technology be replacing human workers. Some imagine that the coming work-free world will be defined by _2_. A few wealthy people will own all the capital, and the masses will struggle in an impoverished wasteland.

   A different and not mutually exclusive _3_ holds that the future will be a wasteland of a different sort, one _4_ by purposelessness: Without jobs to give their lives _5_, people will simply become lazy and depressed. _6_, today’s unemployed don’t seem to be having a great time. One Gallup poll found that 20 percent of Americans who have been unemployed for at least a year report having depression, double the rate for _7_ Americans. Also, some research suggests that the _8_ for rising rates of mortality, mental-health problems, and addicting _9_ poorly-educated middle-aged people is shortage of well-paid jobs. Perhaps this is why many _10_ the agonizing dullness of a jobless future.

    But it doesn’t _11_ follow from findings like these that a world without work would be filled with unease. Such visions are based on the _12_ of being unemployed in a society built on the concept of employment. In the _13_ of work, a society designed with other ends in mind could _14_ strikingly different circumstanced for the future of labor and leisure. Today, the _15_ of work may be a bit overblown. “Many jobs are boring, degrading, unhealthy, and a waste of human potential,” says John Danaher, a lecturer at the National University of Ireland in Galway.

   These days, because leisure time is relatively _16_ for most workers, people use their free time to counterbalance the intellectual and emotional _17_ of their jobs. “When I come home from a hard day’s work, I often feel _18_,” Danaher says, adding, “In a world in which I don’t have to work, I might feel rather different”—perhaps different enough to throw himself _19_ a hobby or a passion project with the intensity usually reserved for _20_ matters. 


8.【单选题】[A] chances 
[B] downsides 
[C] benefits 
[D] principles

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阅读分析

Section Ⅱ Reading Comprehension

  Part A

  Directions:Read the following four texts. Answer the questions after each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1. (40 points)

  Text 1

  Every Saturday morning, at 9 am, more than 50,000 runners set off to run 5km around their local park. The Parkrun phenomenon began with a dozen friends and has inspired 400 events in the UK and more abroad. Events are free, staffed by thousands of volunteers. Runners range from four years old to grandparents; their times range from Andrew Baddeley’s world record 13 minutes 48 seconds up to an hour.

  Parkrun is succeeding where London’s Olympic “legacy” is failing. Ten years ago on Monday, it was announced that the Games of the 30th Olympiad would be in London. Planning documents pledged that the great legacy of the Games would be to level a nation of sport lovers away from their couches。 The population would be fitter, healthier and produce more winners. It has not happened. The number of adults doing weekly sport did rise, by nearly 2 million in the run—up to 2012—but the general population was growing faster. Worse, the numbers are now falling at an accelerating rate. The opposition claims primary school pupils doing at least two hours of sport a week have nearly halved. Obesity has risen among adults and children. Official retrospections continue as to why London 2012 failed to “inspire a generation.” The success of Parkrun offers answers。

  Parkun is not a race but a time trial: Your only competitor is the clock. The ethos welcomes anybody. There is as much joy over a puffed-out first-timer being clapped over the line as there is about top talent shining. The Olympic bidders, by contrast, wanted to get more people doing sports and to produce more elite athletes. The dual aim was mixed up: The stress on success over taking part was intimidating for newcomers.

  Indeed, there is something a little absurd in the state getting involved in the planning of such a fundamentally “grassroots”, concept as community sports associations. If there is a role for government, it should really be getting involved in providing common goods—making sure there is space for playing fields and the money to pave tennis and netball courts, and encouraging the provision of all these activities in schools. But successive governments have presided over selling green spaces, squeezing money from local authorities and declining attention on sport in education。 Instead of wordy, worthy strategies, future governments need to do more to provide the conditions for sport to thrive. Or at least not make them worse.


9.【单选题】Parkrun is different from Olympic games in that it______.
[A] aims at discovering talents
[B] focuses on mass competition
[C] does not emphasize elitism
[D] does not attract first-timers 

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阅读分析

Text 3

  Today, widespread social pressure to immediately go to college in conjunction with increasingly high expectations in a fast-moving world often causes students to completely overlook the possibility of taking a gap year. After all, if everyone you know is going to college in the fall, it seems silly to stay back a year, doesn't it? And after going to school for 12 years, it doesn't feel natural to spend a year doing something that isn't academic.

  But while this may be true, it's not a good enough reason to condemn gap years. There's always a constant fear of falling behind everyone else on the socially perpetuated "race to the finish line," whether that be toward graduate school, medical school or lucrative career. But despite common misconceptions, a gap year does not hinder the success of academic pursuits-in fact, it probably enhances it.

  Studies from the United States and Australia show that students who take a gap year are generally better prepared for and perform better in college than those who do not. Rather than pulling students back, a gap year pushes them ahead by preparing them for independence, new responsibilities and environmental changes-all things that first-year students often struggle with the most. Gap year experiences can lessen the blow when it comes to adjusting to college and being thrown into a brand new environment, making it easier to focus on academics and activities rather than acclimation blunders.

  If you're not convinced of the inherent value in taking a year off to explore interests, then consider its financial impact on future academic choices. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, nearly 80 percent of college students end up changing their majors at least once. This isn’t surprising, considering the basic mandatory high school curriculum leaves students with a poor understanding of themselves listing one major on their college applications, but switching to another after taking college classes. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, but depending on the school, it can be costly to make up credits after switching too late in the game. At Boston College, for example, you would have to complete an extra year were you to switch to the nursing school from another department. Taking a gap year to figure things out initially can help prevent stress and save money later on.


10.【单选题】The most suitable title for this text would be_____.
[A]In Favor of the Gap Year
[B]The ABCs of the Gap Year
[C]The Gap Year Comes Back
[D]The Gap Year: A Dilemma 

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